How to build and maintain cooperations with stores

We collected some information, so that you can avoid some common mistakes and will have your local foodsharing initiative flourishing! We want you to succeed and therefore share our experiences with you, but we, of course, also are aware of extremely differing circumstances in different areas of the world, so don't hesitate to adapt our approach to your situation as much as you see fit!

And please tell us how this all works out for you!

→ Contact us via mail! foodsaving@yunity.org!

→ Join our team chat for direct communication: https://slackin.yunity.org/

We wish you all the best for your foodsaving and sharing! Thank you very much for your will to fight food waste together with us!



Cooperations for the purpose of saving food

Which store to approach?

Every business that handles food can be approached and asked for a cooperation. Be it a supermarket, a restaurant, a canteen, stands at farmer’s markets, a farm, a food wholesale, a street food stand or whatever you can think of or find in your area. It is useful though, to answer some questions before choosing a business:

  • Is the location reachable for enough Foodsavers?
  • Will the amounts of food that can be saved from this store be eaten? (Only contact wholesales if you are able to handle huge quantities!)
  • Will the kind of food that can be saved from this store be eaten? (For example don’t save sausages if you are only surrounded by strict vegans.)

Also, some criteria classify businesses as more likely to cooperate. Stores that

  • sell organic food should be open to environmentalist topics.
  • are run by their proprietor have complete freedom to decide.
  • employ nice people are easier to communicate with.

Like always, these are just vague guidelines to give you some kind of orientation in case you have no idea where to start. If you already have a store in mind, and it happens to not fit above-mentioned
categories, no worries - just go ahead!

How to initiate the contact?

Always try to talk in person to the person in charge. The key to success is confidence: You have a very good reason to ask for cooperation! Just be prepared and then you can convey it!
It is useful to bring some printed background information on food waste in general and positive press regarding already existing cooperations. It also can be a good idea to first call the store and set a date for the meeting since it can make you appear more professional, but this - as always - depends on the store and the general circumstances: Is it a rather bourgeois store that puts emphasis on being professional and organized? Then adapt to this setting and be as organized and professional as you can to please the manager and staff! Is it more relaxed and wants to be seen as chill and cool? Then be chill and cool yourself and they’ll like you!

What to bring:

How to convince the store to participate?

As a general tip: Just assume that nobody wants to senselessly waste perfectly fine food, because it mostly is true! Throwing away goods in totally acceptable state hurts the people who have to do it, so the employees are on your side most of the time anyways. For the higher-ups, who maybe don’t need to face the direct act of wasting, you can always take the detour to talk about money. Every ingredient and product that gets thrown away costs the business money, so why just waste it? On top of that, disposal of garbage is expensive, too! If the store decides to cooperate with you, they can even save money, because you take away a good part of what would have been waste before. Also, if the store wants you to, you can tell everyone that they participate and how amazing this is! That this progressive business understands its role in modern society and doesn’t shy away from taking responsibility to help stop the waste (or something like that…).

A lot of times you will meet managers, who like the idea of foodsharing but say, that they don't throw away anything, that they already cooperate with a food bank or that they will give you a call in case there is something to pick up. These are definitely good points and you should react in an appreciative manner, but still try to get them to cooperate with you on a regular basis, if you have the feeling that it would be worth it. Here are some examples of how to deal with the before-mentioned situations:

"We don't throw away anything."

"It's great that you are aware of the problem and don't waste food on a regular basis! But maybe our definitions of 'nothing' vary, because,you know, we'd also come by for two tomatoes and if there's really nothing to save, we are not disappointed but rather glad that you manage your business so well. How about we just try out a tiny cooperation, where we come by once a week for example and see how it goes? Like I said, you have nothing to lose and if there's really nothing to pick up we are even happier." 

"We give everything to the food bank."

"It's great that you are aware of the problem and already donate the surplus to the food bank! But does the food bank really take everything? What about already expired products or food where the cold chain was slightly broken? We consider a lot more food as edible as the food bank does and there are probably some products, that we would gladly save, which are rejected by them. And if there's really nothing to save, we are not disappointed but rather happy that you manage your business so well. How about we just try out a tiny cooperation, where we come by once a week for example and see how it goes? Like I said, you have nothing to lose and if there's really nothing to pick up we are even happier." 

"We will give you a call in case something can be picked up."

"That is very nice of you, but we know that running a business is stressful at times and that one can easily forget about giving a call, especially when it is a new arrangement. For us it is way more secure to just call you ourselves and see, if we can save some food and if there's really nothing to save, we are not disappointed but rather glad that you manage your business so well. How about we just try out a tiny cooperation, where we come by once a week for example and see how it goes? Like I said, you have nothing to lose and if there's really nothing to pick up we are even happier." 

How to maintain the cooperation?

You got a store to cooperate, congratulations! From now on, just be nice, reliable and do what you told them you would, so that they keep liking you and your initiative.
To make sure every pick-up gets carried out as planned you need to properly organize your foodsaving group, send enough people to take everything offered in one go and be able to substitute short-term pick-up cancellations.

Tasks to fulfill:

  • Make sure every agreed-on pick-up gets carried out
  • Make sure every Foodsaver knows how to behave at the store

Ways to succeed:

  • Have a clear list of who picks up when
  • Have good communication in the whole team
  • Maybe choose one or more so-called Store Coordinators to keep the overview
  • Maybe set behavioural standards like the ones in ‘Professionalism for Foodsavers’
  • Let new Foodsavers accompany experienced ones in the beginning

 

Professionalism for foodsavers

No-Gos

A Foodsaver behaves unprofessional when s(he)

  • shows up late or not at all to a pick-up (s)he had signed up for.
  • shows up for a pick-up (s)he had not signed up for.
  • doesn't take all the food the store provided for the pick-up.
  • takes food the store did not provide for the pick-up.
  • leaves the location of the pick-up in a messy state.
  • shows up at a pick-up smelly, drunk or drugged.
  • brings pets to a pick-up.
  • behaves so unpleasantly noisy that clients of the store start paying attention.
  • tries to greedily get the best and/or most food for her/himself.
  • makes uncalled-for comments about the amount of food, that can be picked up.
  • starts discussions about who gets what while still in the store.

How a pick-up is supposed to take place instead

After pointing out the worst mistakes above, we’d now like to give some constructive advice on how to establish the most pleasant atmosphere possible while dealing with employees of stores.

  • We are friendly, polite and work efficiently.
  • We are silent and don't take much time.
  • We abide by the rules and wishes of the store.
  • We wait for each other in front of the store and enter together.
  • We bring our own bags and boxes to transport the food.
  • We tidy up the location of the pick-up as good as we can.
  • We have good communication in the pick-up team to know about possible special circumstances.
  • We cancel a pick-up at least 24h before it is supposed to take place, if need may be. If that does for some reason not work out, we independently find a replacement.